“Reeses” Peanut Butter Protein Bars

Let’s be honest about something. Most store bought protein bars are glorified candy bars disguised as health food. They are loaded with sugar and artificial ingredients, highly processed, and some even contain unhealthy trans fats! Eating most protein bars is the equivalent to reaching for a snickers – and does that sound like a good weight loss or body building strategy? I think we can all agree – absolutely not.

With this knowledge, could there possibly be a way to enjoy a protein bar while not sacrificing taste or sabotaging our health goals? I am here to tell you, YES. The best way to achieve this is to make your own at home. This way,ย you can select the best ingredients, you will know exactly what you are consuming, they will be fresh, and will not contain any preservatives (anything on a store shelf contains someย level of preservative ingredients).ย But, of course, always enjoy in moderation to reap the most health benefits.

I never want my family to feel deprived, but I also put our health at the top of my priorities. Finding ways to enjoy all food groups with my children will hopefully result in a healthy relationship with food and an understanding of what it means to care for ourselves from the inside out. I want to instill healthy ways of cooking, baking, and daily living in my children while they are young, because these early developmental years are crucial for establishing their habits and preferences as they grow into adulthood.

This recipe was inspired by my family’s love for sweet treats, my desire for convenience, and my constant quest for healthy alternatives.ย Itย has minimal ingredients and is super easy to make. I hope you enjoy them as much as we do!

 

To start, make the bottom layer.

Peanut butter Dough

Ingredients:

1 16 oz jar organic peanut butter (or any other nut/seed butter of choice)

ยพ cup coconut flour

ยผ cup raw stevia or 3 tsp stevia extract (I used powdered extract)

Method:

  1. Blend ingredients in a high speed blender
  2. Spread into a baking dish. (I used an 8×6.)
  3. Put in freezer to set while you make the chocolate.

 

Dark Chocolateย 

Ingredients:

1 cup cacao butter

1 cup cacao powder

ยผ cup raw stevia or 3 tsp stevia extract

1 tsp vanilla

(Note: this makes a bitter dark chocolate. Add more/less sweetener to your taste preference)

Method:

  1. In a double boiler, melt cacao butter.
  2. Add cacao powder and stevia. Mix well. Add vanilla.
  3. Remove pan from freezer, and gently pour chocolate over peanut butter evenly.
  4. Top with any extras you’d like – coconut, walnuts, fruit, cinnamon, etc.
  5. Place back in freezer until chocolate hardens.
  6. Cut into portion sized pieces and enjoy!

 

(I often enjoy mine broken up into pieces over a morning smoothie bowl. How will you enjoy yours?!)

 

Always remember, you have the power to take control of your health. Think of how your food is serving you. Thank you reading.

With love,

Brittany

The Mind Body Connection

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Self-worth, as defined in the English dictionary, is the sense of one’s own value, or worth as a person; self-esteem; self respect.

Recently, I have come to realize that I have relied on other people to determine my self-worth throughout my entire life. In order to feel confident, happy, and content, I have needed family, friends, and even strangers to affirm all of my accomplishments, big or small, and justify all of the things that do not go as planned. It has been my security blanket and protection from any form of discomfort.

I also have a history of people pleasing. I put the preferences of others ahead of my own and disregard my feelings entirely to avoid upsetting anyone else. Since my self-worth depends on everyone thinking highly of me, I avoid confrontation like the plague.

I never fully felt the effects of this until I became a mom. Suddenly, the attention shifted away from me and onto my children, and it also became harder and harder to please everyone since I was no longer the only person in the equation. I often felt alone, isolated, and that I had lost my identity. I slowly felt my anxiety increasing as time went on, and then I was introduced to the true meaning of depression.

This experience led me to discover that health is not only about the foods that we eat and whether or not we exercise. I eat a very nourishing diet and move my body every day, but while I was feeling mentally defeated, stressed out, and just sub par, it took a toll on my physical health as well.

As a person who suffers from food sensitivities, I noticed that when I was feeling my worst, my symptoms also worsened and new ones developed. My feelings on the inside were directly reflected on the outside. I was having break outs, digestive problems, facial flushing, fatigue, joint pain, weakness, and much more.

Depression effects many people and it can display itself in a variety of ways. Aside from extreme sadness and withdrawal, a person may also experience chronic pain, weight gain, a short temper, skin issues, a loss of focus, feelings of apathy, and may be more inclined to rely on drugs and alcohol.

If you are starting on a path to live a happy and healthier life, I encourage you to take a look at all factors that contribute to your well-being. This may include your job, your relationships, your sleep habits, and physical activity just to name a few. We need to treat our mind, body, and soul as one if we truly want to live abundantly healthful lives.

 

Diet Changes Everything.

It seems that at one point or another, everyone has tried some sort of diet out there. There are so many to choose from – Paleo, Atkins, South Beach, Vegan, Vegetarian, Keto, Gluten Free, The Blood Type Diet, Weight Watchers…the list goes on and on.

The problem with traditional “dieting” is that we are all uniquely different. This concept is referred to as bio-individuality. While one person may thrive on a particular diet, another person may feel sick, have low energy, and experience a host of other issues directly correlated to the foods they are consuming.

We all want to look and feel our best, but it can be challenging and very confusing to determine what dietary lifestyle to follow when so many of the popular diets out there contradict each other.

The best diet for you will depend on many factors. Your age, gender, ancestry, activity level, food sensitivities or allergies, and your specific DNA make up all play a role in determining what should be on your plate.

First, determine why you want to change your diet. Do you want to lose weight? Do you suspect food sensitivities? Are you often tired or run down? Are you experiencing break outs and/or other skin issues? These questions will help determine a starting point. For instance, I find that eliminating dairy dramatically improved my skin, and the elimination of gluten put a stop to my bloat and stomach discomfort.

To figure out what lifestyle will best suit your individual needs, experiment with different ways of eating. In the beginning, it may be helpful to simply eat more vegetables and fruits, less meat, dairy, and sugar, and limit your consumption of alcohol and caffeine.

Remember, these things take time. Be patient with your body, and listen closely to what it is telling you. No one knows you like you do. You are your own best advocate for feeling well and living your best life.